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Lloret de Mar

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The Costa Brava


The Costa Brava

 

 

Like a canvas where nature has intended to combine with exquisite delicacy the intense green of the pine groves, the massivesteadfastness of the rocks, the softness of the golden sands and the deep, dazzling blue of the sea - that is the Costa Brava.

     

From Blanes to Portbou, the list of things to do includes the Cap de Creus Natural Park, with themonastery of Sant Pere deRodes and the village of Cadaqués, the marshes of the Aiguamolls de l’Empordà Natural Park and the Medes Islands MarineReserve, and unique settings such as Roses bay, the ruins of Empúries, the coves of Begur and Palafrugell, Sant Sebastiàlighthouse, Cap Roig gardens, the Old Town of Tossa de Mar and the Santa Clotilde, Pinya de Rosa and Marimurtra botanicalgardens, between Lloret and Blanes. 


Do not forget to visit the shopping and leisure centres at Roses, L’Escala, L’Estartit, Palamós, Platja d’Aro, Sant Feliu deGuíxols, Lloret de Mar and Blanes.

Our route will lead us to discover places such as Peralada – with its castle and casino –, Figueres, with its museum devoted tothe universal artist Salvador Dalí, medieval villages such as Pals, Peratalladaand Púbol, the pottery shops at La Bisbal, thescenery of the Pla de l’Estany county with its capitalBanyoles, and the city of Girona, with its cathedral and internationallyfamous Jewish Quarter. 

    


And on top of all this, one of the features we can display with greatest pride is the quality of our beaches and coastal waters, the result of considerable work put into quality monitoring and water treatment which has over and over again been accoladed for its quality by the European Environmental Education Foundation, as seen from the many blue flags which flutter in the breeze along our coastline.

In addition, the beaches of Lloret de Mar and Fenals have obtained the “Q” certificate of tourism quality awarded by the ICTE, and the beaches of Santa Margarida, Salatar, El Rastell, La Nova, La Punta, Canyelles-Bonifaci and L'Almadrava (in Roses) and those of Sant Antoni, Cala Cristus-Ses Torretes, Torre Valentina and Es Monestri (in Calonge) have won the EMAS environmental quality certificate.


Source: Patronat de Turisme Costa Brava Girona

 


Tossa de Mar

Tossa de Mar

Tossa de Mar (Catalan pronunciation: [ˈtosə ðə ˈmar]) is a municipality in Catalonia, Spain, located on the Costa Brava, about 103 kilometres north of Barcelona and 100 kilometres south of the French border. It is accessible through Girona Airport, some distance north.

Contrary to popular belief that Tossa has traditionally been a fishing town, in medieval times and until the arrival of tourism, the local economy was mostly based on agricultural production, principally Grape vine and cork. There was a thriving export market of the latter (in the form of cork taps shipped to the Americas) during the 18th century and early 19th century.

Fishing has traditionally been a relatively minor contributor to the village's economy, although it has consistently provided an alternative source of income in times of economic crisis. A small fishing industry is still active as of 2005 and occupies a few members of local fishing families. Most of their captures are sold to local restaurants and in the fish markets in neighbouring Blanes and Sant Feliu de Guíxols.

Tossa de Mar has three main beaches:

  • The Tossa Beach (Platja Gran), in front of downtown. This beach is closed off on the west by the medieval castle. It has a length of 380 m and a width of 60 m.
  • La Mar Menuda, on the other side of the bay. It has all services and facilities, such a sport equipment. Local police patrol the area on bicycles. It has a length of 180m and a width of 20 m.
  • El Codolar, behind the walls.


Lloret de Mar

Lloret de Mar


Girona

Girona

Girona has all the charm of a large city but without the crowds; a very “human-sized” city that will leave you walking around awestruck with your eyes wide open and your mouth agape at all it has to offer: its streets, festivals, cultural activities, restaurants, tourist services and events. Make the most of your visit at any time of year, and if you can, visit more than once, because the city is very much alive and there are always new things to surprise you.


Barcelona

Barcelona

monumentos barcelona

Barcelona has always been a city open to the world. Barcelona’s calling has much to do with its highly strategic geographical location. Its port has played a fundamental role as the place of arrival for people from round the world and as a point of exchange of cultures. Barcelona is the “North of the South and the South of the North” and one of the gateways joining Europe, Africa and the Middle East, across the Mediterranean.
The cradle of Catalan culture, amongst many other cultures and civilisations, and a witness to major transformations such as the Industrial Revolution or the Civil War amongst many others, Barcelona has a fascinating history. Find out more about it!

Història

A walk through the history of Barcelona
The first human settlements in Barcelona date back to Neolithic times. The city itself was founded by the Romans who set up a colony called Barcino at the end of the 1st century BC. The colony had some thousand inhabitants and was bounded by a defensive wall, the remains of which can still be seen in the old town.
For over 200 years, Barcelona was under Muslim rule, and, following the Christian reconquest, it became a county of the Carolingian Empire and one of the main residences of the court of the Crown of Aragon. The fruitful medieval period established Barcelona's position as the economic and political centre of the Western Mediterranean. The city’s Gothic Quarter bears witness to the splendour enjoyed by the city from the 13th to the 15th centuries.
Història
From the 15th to 18th centuries Barcelona entered a period of decline, while it struggled to maintain its economic and political independence. This struggle ended in 1714, when the city fell to the Bourbon troops and Catalonia’s and Catalans’ rights and privilegeswere suppressed. 
A period of cultural recovery began in the mid-19th century with the arrival of the development of the textile industry. During this period, which was known as the Renaixença, Catalan regained prominence as a literary language.
The 20th century ushered in widespread urban renewal throughout Barcelona city, culminating in its landmark Eixample district, which showcases some of Barcelona’s most distinctive Catalan art-nouveau, or modernista, buildings. The Catalan Antoni Gaudí, one of the most eminent architects, designed buildings such as the Casa Milà (known as La Pedrera, the Catalan for stone quarry), the Casa Batlló and the Sagrada Família church, which have become world-famous landmarks.
Història
The freedoms achieved during this period were severely restricted during the Civil War in 1936 and the subsequent dictatorship. With the reinstatement of democracy in 1978, Barcelona society regained its economic strength and the Catalan language was restored. The city's hosting of the 1992 Olympic Games gave fresh impetus to Barcelona's potential and reaffirmed its status as a major metropolis.
In 2004, the Forum of Cultures reclaimed industrial zones to convert them into residential districts. An example of the renewed vigour with which Barcelona is looking towards the 21st century.

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